Rochdale News Online ‘Prison Me? No Way!

February 27, 2014

St Cuthbert Year 9 pupils with Simon Danczuk, MP, Ruth Sillence, RBH Communities First Co-ordinator and police officers

St Cuthbert Year 9 pupils with Simon Danczuk, MP, Ruth Sillence, RBH Communities First Co-ordinator and police officers

Year 9 pupils at St Cuthbert’s RC High School recently experienced a very different day. As part of a borough wide scheme to reduce future rates in crime, students were made aware of the devastating impact that prison could have on their lives.

Students were involved in workshops throughout the day that focused on different aspects of crime and safety awareness ranging from; participation in a mock trial in a court room, role play in a street scene depicting the consequences of anti-social behaviour, speaking to a current inmate, the importance of staying safe online and some even spent time in a replica prison cell.

The consequences of anti-social behaviour were brought home when the pupils turned actors to role play the different people it impacts via a portable street scene. From the mother whose baby wakes up because of noise outside to the shop keeper who has to close down because he is intimidated by young people trying to buy alcohol, the group learned about the wide ranging impact that anti–social behaviour has on the community.

The project, which is run by the No Way Trust, was subsidised by Rochdale Boroughwide Housing and is working its way around Rochdale secondary schools.

Ruth Sillence, RBH Communities First Co-ordinator, said: “We have lots of wonderful young people across our neighbourhoods and we’re determined to do everything we can to allow them to achieve their full potential.

“Part of this involves ensuring that they realise what a grim experience prison is and how harmful it can be to their personal lives and future careers.

Simon Danczuk, MP for Rochdale, joined the pupils for the morning sessions and commented on the great work of Rochdale Borough Housing, he said: “I was delighted to visit St Cuthbert’s, there is always a great atmosphere and the project I observed was excellent.

“It is important for lots of reasons that young people know how the criminal justice system works and I’m pleased that St Cuthbert’s have got involved in this project.”

Pupils treated like prisoners – Eastwood & Kimberley Advertiser

January 21, 2014

Pupils treated like prisoners

editorial image

editorial image

Pupils at Eastwood Comprehensive School will get an inside look at life in prison at a special workshop being held at the end of the month.

 

The ‘Prison Me? No Way!’ national charity will visit the school on January 29 in a bid to put kids off mis-behaving and getting involved in the wrong crowds.

Pupils will be shown around a life-like prison cell and will take part in various workshops being hosted by the fire service and a drugs agency.

The charity that co-ordinates the sessions was originally set up by three serving prison officers back in 1994.

They wanted to help raise awareness among young people about the causes, consequences and penalties of crime and the effects of antisocial behaviour.

One of the charity volunteers Nathan Barber said: “We try to treat them like prisoners throughout the day as much as we can.

“We tend to work with years eight, nine and ten as there’s a lot of peer pressure around that age.”

The sessions at Eastwood Comp have been funded by the South Nottinghamshire Community Safety Partnership.

The partnership provides a number of initiatives to tackle crime including high-visibility policing, CCTV surveillance and project work.

Granville Sport College

November 26, 2013

Prison Me! No Way!!!

On Thursday 17th October Granville had a curriculum collapse day. Year 10 had the opportunity to explore prison and the consequences of bad decisions. They gathered in the hall and met prison officers who told them that they would be prisoners for the day. They then went to a variety of workshops. The “Street Scene” was an interactive drama where pupils could see how “hanging out with your mates” could become anti-social behaviour. In “ASTRA” the pupils saw the consequences of drink driving in graphic detail. Pupils also learnt about CEOP and how it supports young people who are victims of internet crime and they met a prisoner who told them what prison was really like. Most pupils were shocked that it wasn’t the cosy life some newspapers make it out to be. They also had the chance to look inside a prison cell and see what a prisoner was allowed to have.

In the feedback all of the pupils said it was an effective day and really made them think about choices they might make. See below some comments from pupils and staff:

“I thought the day was valuable. The street scene showed me how stupid people can act when they’re drunk. The bit that stands out from the day was when we talked to the prisoner.” Jalman 

“The Astra workshop shows you crimes which are really dangerous and makes you think about it. When I got home I told my Dad the dangers of driving and that he could crash if he uses the phone whilst driving and now he has stopped.”  Millie

“What really stood out was the street scene because it was really interesting. You got more in-depth detail about anti-social behaviour.”  Luke

“I thought the street scene was entertaining and pupils were engaged. I watched the same scene three times and it was different each time depending on the pupils”.  Mrs Trewin

“C.E.O.P was an excellent workshop! Pupils are taught this subject matter, but having C.E.O.P in reinforced the topic and it makes the pupils understand.” Miss Warren

http://www.granville.derbyshire.sch.uk/

PMNW

YOUNGSTERS found out about the harsh realities of prison life during a day of insightful workshops – Hartlepool Mail

November 14, 2013

Dyke House pupils find out harsh realities of prison life

Dyke House Sports and Tecnology College student Cameron Barker in a mock prison cell

Dyke House Sports and Tecnology College student Cameron Barker in a mock prison cell

YOUNGSTERS found out about the harsh realities of prison life during a day of insightful workshops.

 

The students at Dyke House Sports and Technology College were told about the day-to-day life of those serving time and found out more about the criminal system.

It was all part of a day in school organised by Prison Me! No-Way!!, a charity set up by prison officers in 1993 in an effort to turn young people away from a life of crime.

The students at Dyke House took part in a number of workshops and also got the opportunity to question a prisoner who joined the charity’s representatives in visiting the school for the day.

Phil Wilson, director of community liaison for the charity, said: “The whole idea of what we do is to raise awareness of all of the many issues that come with a life in crime and anti-social behaviour.

“I know for a fact that 95 per cent of the young people we speak to won’t go on to a life of crime.

“We can’t make decisions for youngsters but what we can do is raise awareness and challenge any misconceptions young people have about life in prison.”

Phil added: “The feedback from the school and the students was fantastic which is great.

“Dyke House has supported us from the very start.”

‘Students to gets tips on how to avoid prison life’ Derby Telegraph

November 12, 2013

By Derby Telegraph  |  Posted: November 02, 2013

 Comments (0)PUPILS at a city secondary school will learn how to avoid prison – and the consequences of crime and disorder – during a day of activities on Wednesday.

Merrill Academy has teamed up with The No Way Trust, which run a programme entitled Prison – Me – No Way, to give hard-hitting messages to the 14 and 15-year-old students at the Alvaston school.

The day will include displays, activities and talks by a range of professionals, including: a life-sized replica of a jail cell constructed in a van; re-enactments and role play of how it only takes one punch to kill or inflict permanent damage by charity Split Second; and talks about life in prison from offenders.

There will also be information given out about the consequences of anti-social behaviour, its impact on local communities and the dangers of carrying knives.

Head teacher Andrew Scott said: “We have organised this day to highlight some important messages to our year-nine students, who are at the start of their young adult lives.

“It is about giving them the information and confidence both to stay safe and to make the right choices, should they find themselves in situations which mean breaking the law.

“We hope it will reinforce the message about avoiding negative peer pressure and opening their eyes to the relationship between actions and consequences in life.”

Read more: http://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/Students-gets-tips-avoid-prison-life/story-20025070-detail/story.html#ixzz2kRdyQiav

Students get a taste of porridge – Rochdale Online

October 28, 2013

Students get a taste of porridge

Date published: 17 October 2013

 

Oulder Hill students spend time in the replica cellOulder Hill students spend time in the replica cell

School pupils spoke to two serving prisoners and spent time in a replica jail cell as part of a project to deter them from a life of crime and  to make the students aware of the devastating impact that prison could have on their lives.

The Prison Me? No Way! sessions at Hollingworth Business and Enterprise College and Oulder Hill Community School gave Year 9 students the chance to talk to two current inmates about how imprisonment had affected them.

In addition the pupils spent time inside the replica cell, tried on prison uniforms – consisting of second-hand clothes that had been worn by other prisoners – and took part in role-playing as victims of anti-social behaviour.

Rochdale Boroughwide Housing (RBH) worked with national charity the No Way Trust together with the Police, Prison Service, Fire Service, Community Magistrates and Rochdale Borough Council to raise awareness of the serious consequences of crime.

Ruth Sillence, RBH Communities First Co-ordinator, said: “We have lots of wonderful young people across our neighbourhoods and we’re determined to do everything we can to allow them to achieve their full potential.

“Part of this involves ensuring that they realise what a grim experience prison is and how harmful it can be to their personal lives and future careers.

“As our borough is officially the World Capital of co-operatives, it’s also fitting that we were able to work with a number of other organisations to bring this important message home.”

Jersey – Channel Online.tv

October 28, 2013

Funding concerns for Prison! Me! No Way!

Louisa Pilbeam reports. Movie footage courtesy Entertainment One Films

Organisers of a scheme that helps Jersey maintain one of the lowest levels of crime in the world, say it is important they secure their funding for the future.

Prison! Me! No Way! is a series of workshops where police officers and prison guards visit schools and tell youngsters the gritty truth of crime and prison.

The scheme costs £60,000 to run each year – a grant it gets from the States – but the financial backing is only secure for the next year.

Organisers of the project are concerned that with an election in 2014, the new government will not necessarily support it, and they say they are an important part of the ‘jigaw’ that helps keep youth crime low in the island.

Crime levels among young people in Jersey are at their lowest level – dropping a third last year on the year before. A total of 211 offences were committed by young people last year; 132 fewer than in 2011 and more than three times fewer than in 2009.

Jersey’s Magistrates Court Annual Report for 2012 also showed that the workload within the Youth Court had declined dramatically year on year, with 71 cases being dealt with in 2012, compared to 179 in 2011. That is a huge decrease of 60% compared to 2011, when the level itself was the lowest since the 1990s.

Wolfreton School pupils get an inside look at life in prison – Hull Daily Mail

October 28, 2013

Wolfreton School pupils get an inside look at life in prison

By Hull Daily Mail  |  Posted: October 21, 2013

By Trudi Davidson

  • MESSAGE: Paul Wilkinson speaking to pupils.
  • HARD CELL: Pupils Thomas Verde, 13, and Erin Findlay, 13, in the “prison cell”. Pictures: Kate Woolhouse
 Comments (4)PUPILS at an East Riding school were put off prison when they saw the inside of a cell.Students at Wolfreton School learned about life behind bars when the educational charity Prison! Me! No Way! visited the Willerby secondary.

The Year 9 pupils had the chance to go inside the charity’s mobile prison cell, as well as hear first-hand accounts from prisoners.

Pupil Erin Findlay, 13, said: “The prison cell was dark, cold and smelly. I think it will make students realise there is nothing glamorous about being in prison – it’s really not worth it.

“It has been very interesting seeing the reality of everything for myself, as it’s very different to how you see things portrayed on television.”

Fellow student Thomas Verde, also 13, said: “It was very cramped and I certainly wouldn’t want to be in there for very long.

“It really helps you experience what life would be like if you were in prison, and it’s definitely not a situation I would want to be in.”

Pupils were joined at the crime awareness day by Stephen Larard, High Sheriff of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

Mr Larard said: “Prison! Me! No Way! does amazingly important work, helping to dispel the myth that there is any “street cred” attached to criminal behaviour.

“They show that the reality is very different – you lose your family, friends, possessions, liberty and dignity.

“I am delighted to be able to support both the charity and Wolfreton School in helping to get this message across to students.”

Students joined workshops including a crime scene investigation session, where they learned about fingerprint analysis.

They also heard first-hand accounts from current and ex-prisoners about how crime and prison has affected their lives.

Paul Wilkinson, chief executive of the charity, said: “We are celebrating twenty years of Prison! Me! No Way! and we have been coming in to Wolfreton for most of that time.

“The workshops we offer have developed enormously over the years and it is important to improve and enhance the programme each year.

“This year we have brought our dogs to demonstrate to the students how the animals are trained to detect illegal substances that try to make their way in to our prisons.”

A key focus of the charity’s work this year includes issues associated with the development of social media, particularly mobile phones and Facebook.

Mr Wilkinson said: “It is all great technology but it needs to be used with caution.

“We need to educate students about the responsible way to use social media, to ensure they stay safe and use the technology in a positive way that does not create long-lasting problems.”

Headteacher Dave McCready thanked the charity and the High Sheriff for their support.

He said: “This is a wonderful day that encourages students to think very carefully about their future and choosing the right path in life.”

 

Read more: http://legacy.thisishullandeastriding.co.uk/Wolfreton-School-pupils-inside-look-life-prison/story-19964374-detail/story.html#ixzz2j1pMSfbA

Rochdale News – ‘Students get Lessons in Prison Life’

July 3, 2013

Students get lessons in prison life

Date published: 26 June 2013

Students get lessons in prison life<br />

Students get lessons in prison life

1 More Image(s) In Gallery

Pupils from Siddall Moor Sports College got a taste of life behind bars as part of an innovative scheme to teach them about the consequences of crime and anti-social behaviour.

The Year 9 pupils heard first hand from two women who are currently serving sentences at Styal prison in Cheshire about how they ended up in jail and what the personal consequences have been for them.

The powerful talk was part of a crime day organised by the Prison Me No Way charity which runs similar sessions across the country.

As part of the day, the students also swapped the classroom for a replica prison cell and tried on the standard prison uniform of second hand clothes which have been worn by other prisoners.

The consequences of anti-social behaviour were brought home when the young people turned actors to role play different people affected by it on a portable street scene. From the mother whose baby wakes up because of noise outside to the shop keeper who has to close down because he is intimidated by young people trying to buy alcohol, the group learned about the wide ranging impact that anti–social behaviour has on the community.

The teenagers also had lessons on knife crime and the importance of staying vigilant online while the fire service dropped in to teach them about the dangers of hoax calls and arson.

Councillor Sultan Ali, Cabinet Member for Strengthening Communities at Rochdale Borough Council said: “The vast majority of young people in Rochdale behave very well and are a credit to the borough and the fact that anti-social behaviour has been reducing throughout the year is testament to this.

“But a small minority of young people may be tempted to make bad decisions and this is why workshops like these are so important. By giving them the facts we are putting them in the best position to make the right decisions and fulfil their potential.”

The crime days, which are sponsored by Rochdale Boroughwide Housing, have been taking place at schools across the borough, with students from St Cuthbert’s Roman Catholic Business and Enterprise College, Middleton Technology College and Kingsway Park School among those who have already hosted the volunteers from Prison Me No Way.

The sessions are part of Safe4Summer, a Greater Manchester-Wide Campaign which sees the police, fire service, council and other agencies come together as the community safety partnership to reduce anti-social behaviour during the summer months.

Throughout the summer, a huge range of activities will be available for young people through the Youth Service and Link4Life, while the police will be stepping up their anti-social behaviour patrols in key places like parks. Trading standards officers will also be out in force with young volunteers to ensure that shops are not selling alcohol to youngsters.

For more information on the Safe4Summer campaign, visit www.safe4summer.com.

Newham Recorder – ‘Stratford students serve time in replica cell to turn them off crime’

May 30, 2013

Melissa York, ReporterTuesday, May 28, 2013
5:02 PM

 

Prison officers, police, and former offenders spent a day educating students at Newham College about the realities of a life of crime.

 

Around 270 teenagers aged 16 to 19 took part in workshops at the college’s Stratford Campus on May 16 with charity Prison Me No-Way!, Serco, and Newham Action Against Domestic Violence.

The students experienced what it was like to sit in a replica jail cell constructed in a van, took part in role plays and group discussions, and received guidance from experts.

George Melvin, manager of literacy courses who dubbed the event “Leaders of Tomorrow”, said: “This is not just about young people avoiding jail sentences.

“It’s more so about encouraging them to lead their peers away from crime and to open their eyes to the close relation between actions and consequences in life.

“By giving them tools to beat crime and encouraging personal development, they can show other young people that law breaking is not a good option.”

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